Mike Bailie / Lorne Mountain

Mike has been the driving force behind the Mile 9 Dump in Lorne Mountain for the last twenty (20) years. He has helped to make it a community facility that hosts events and facilitates education!

According to Mike, at Lorne Mountain they currently divert 50% of their waste, and have been doing so for close to a decade. That is something to be proud of! They set up measurement systems, actual weights when they could get them and conservative estimates when they couldn’t. They actually went into dumpsters in the wintertime and weighed/measured how much stuff in them was recyclable. It turned out that 80% of the materials were recyclable! They left it all out of the dumpsters to show people what could be done differently. They then wondered what could happen with a little education…

They got ten (10) families and helped them learn about recycling as well as helped them set up easy in-home waste management systems. The families weighed their compost, recycling and garbage over a four (4) month period and the average was 75% diversion with 4 families over 90%.Not bad – but that was residential garbage…

They then moved on to see how much could be diverted from Industrial/Commercial settings. They had Aroma Borealis, Lorne Mountain Community Association (LMCA) and Golden Horn School involved in trying to see how much they could divert. They went into the classrooms and talked to kids,  set up recycling stations in each class and got them competing against each other and the teachers. Aroma Borealis was able to divert 95% of it’s waste over a six (6) month period (and still does several years later), LMCA did over 90% and Goldenhorn School was over 70%.

Our latest project is to increase our community diversion rate to 75%. We plan on accomplishing this through intensive 1-on-1 education as well as ramping up diversion programs such as our electronic waste program. We are tearing down electronics and appliances that aren’t recyclable into their base components and recycling them. Almost everything is made of paper, plastic, metal or wood so if we break things down to that level then we can recycle the materials and divert it from the landfill.

Darren Holcombe

Darren lives outside of town and goes to the Deep Creek dump each week to drop off their one tiny bag of garbage and some wood/tin scraps from projects. More often than not he comes home with much more than he left there.  In the above photo, he and his partner Lara are modelling the brand new shirts they found (still in the packaging!). Below is a photo of what they brought home from a single trip…

His work bench was created entirely from salvaged wood, complete with a salvaged vice that was modified to fit the bench. Darren also creates various pieces for sale such as funky birdhouses and beautiful toolboxes made from repurposed materials.

Here’s Darren discussing his low-impact lifestyle.